MOHS Surgery

Today, Mohs surgery has come to be accepted as the single most effective technique for removing Basal Cell Carcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma (BCCs and SCCs), the two most common skin cancers. Mohs surgery is a surgical technique that removes layers of skin containing Basal Cell Carcinoma or Squamous Cell Carcinoma, the two most common skin cancers, until only cancer-free tissue remains. This technique, also known as Mohs micrographic surgery, has a cure rate of 98 percent or higher and is known as the most effective treatment for skin cancers in anatomic areas where tissue preservation is prioritized due to its micrographic control, which lends to precise tissue removal.

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

HOW IS MOHS SURGERY PERFORMED?

Mohs surgery is performed in four steps with the first step being the surgical removal of a visible tumor usually within a 1 to 1.5 mm margin of uninvolved skin under local anesthesia. After the offending tissue is surgically removed, it is processed, frozen, cut within a margin of 5 and 10 micrometers on a cryostat, placed on slides, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) to be examined for cancerous cells by a Mohs pathologist. Should the tissue be confirmed of cancer, it is then indicated for removal, and the procedure is repeated until no further cancer is detected.

HOW IS THE RECOVERY?

Mohs surgical procedure recovery is usually easy, with minimal discomfort. Therefore, patients usually require minimal or no pain medication. Patients are recommended to rest for a few days after surgery and sutures are usually removed anywhere from 4 days to 2 weeks from the date of surgery.

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